Christian Lalonde

Since 1997, Christian Lalonde has worked as a commercial photographer with Photolux Studio, working in the world of Photography for many local, national and international clients, in both the private and public sector.

Prior to working with Photolux, Christian was a photgrapher at one of Canada’s largest commercial studios, located in Montreal, and was a teacher of photography at La Cité collégiale.

As a principal photographer at Photolux Commercial Studio, at age 39, Christian Lalonde has made his mark in the industry.  His work demonstrates a remarkable versatility as a commercial photographer and photo illustrator.

Christian completed his photography studies in 1996 from La Cité collégiale in Ottowa, Ontario, Canada.  Since joining Photolux in 1997, he has secured clients such as: Bank of Canada, Ontario Tourims, Costco Wholesale, Crown Plaza Hotels, Estée Lauder, IBM, Le Cordon Bleu, Loblaws, Maple Leaf, Agriculture & Agri-food Canada, National Art Centre, Nygard, Readers Digest, Sony, Trump and Yves St. Laurent, just to name a few.

One of his most prestigious projects can be seen on the $5 and $100 dollar bills that have been in circulation since 2001 in Canadian currency.

As part of his impressive repertoire Christian was named “Canadian Commercial Photographer of the Year” in 2001 and 2002 by the Professional Photographer of Canada (PPOC).  He has been highlighted in several international trade magazines and publications.  Recognized for his experience in lighting as well as his high standards in photography, Christian has been speaking for the last 9 years at WPPI, one of the worlds largest photographer conventions and trade shows, held in Las Vegas, Nevada.  His work is also feature by MOAB Papers as well as LiteShapers (XP Photo Gear) on a regular basis.

 

“Love them!!! Consistent color, consistent output, fast recycling times.  Great power output.  RELIABLE!!!” -Christian Lalonde

See more of Christian’s work at www.photoluxstudio.com

 

Photo Assistant Boot Camp & Studio lighting Basics

Mexico_Michaud_Macys-WestMay 3-4 2014 (New York City)

For the last 12 years, we have offered our Photo Assistant Boot Camp; and as the commercial photography industry evolves, so have we.

Working as Photographers Assistants is one of the best ways of learning the inner workings in the commercial photography industry. In addition working as a Photographers Assistant is also the best way to sharpen your: on-set technical, production and lighting skills.

Our Photo Assistant Boot Camp compresses much of that learning time into a 2 day intensive hands-on workshop. In our Photo Assistant Boot Camp, attendees will be working with every piece of equipment that they would regularly come across during your first 6-9 months of working as a photographers assistant on commercial shoots. Our proven method of teaching old-school photo knowledge, on set skills, set-etiquette, and business practices mean you are better prepared for working in real world studio situations.

TimsSquareBeautyDishThis workshop is for both photo assistants as well as those photographers looking to improve their studio lighting skills. The lighting setups that I present in this workshop are based upon the exact lighting setups or variations on those that that I was hired to create for those famous and in-famous photographers I worked with during my days as a Photo Assistant and Lighting Tech.

As the photography industry evolved from film to digital, the role of a Photographers Assistant has evolved and Photo Assistants must now become more technically proficient in lighting than ever before as their roll on set increasing evolves to that of: “Lighting Technician”.

Traditionally, Photo Assistant skills were taught by the Photographers they worked with and other Photo Assistants. The more you assisted and the more diverse a group of photographers you assisted, the more you learned; thus, the better your skill set become and the more value you as an assistant you had to bring to the production.

We’ve all attended those photo workshops or events were you walk into a room and are greeted with row upon row of folding chairs. This is hardly the most appropriate way to teach photography of any sort. It makes very little sense to teach lighting or photography in an environment that is in no way connected to the realities of the “Commercial Photo experience”.

For that reason I have for the last 12 years have been presenting our Photo Assistant Boot Camp, and Studio Lighting Workshops in many of the real NYC. photo rental studios of all descriptions, shapes, and sizes that I have personally been working in during my 20+ years in NYC. From huge 6000 sqft. spaces with 20 foot ceilings to 1200 sqft. photographers lofts in mid town Manhattan. Because there is no constant or standard that any photographer or assistant should expect to find. As a professional it is our job to be adaptable to any working environment or situation and be the best possible and most skilled individual on the photographic team in order to create the best possible images.

At our Studio Lighting Workshop I attempt to create as close to a real world shooting environment as possible that is also interlaced with the learning experience.Within the first hour you will be handling pro-studio lighting equipment and setting up lighting scenarios. At the same time you will be introduced to the equipment that is being used across the country in pro rental studios and high-end commercial shoots.

photoboot

Click here fore more information and registration

“There is no one right way of doing things” in photography (and anyone that says other wise clearly does not have a clue) and the tricks and tips that you will learn at my or others workshops will in time prove to be invaluable.

Click Here For More Information and To Register for this event.

Location Lighting Workshop with Rick Friedman

To learn about portable lighting techniques that have enabled Rick Friedman to capture his on-location, award-winning imagery around the world, sign up and join in for one of his upcoming comprehensive workshops!  One of the key things that he will share in a “very hands-on way” is how to better control your lighting.  This dynamic, intensive, interactive seminar is designed for portrait photographers, photojournalists, corporate and event photographers, weddings photographers, and serious amateurs who want to improve their knowledge of illumination and lighting.  If you attend Rick’s class, you can plan on leaving feeling empowered to capture great images no matter what lighting situation you come up against!

 

Location Lighting Workshops ™ 2014 Schedule

2014LLWRF

January 18-19, 2014
The Societies Photographic Convention, London, UK
January 18 Creative Lighting
January 19 Location Lighting

January 31-February 1
Location Lighting Workshop , Calumet Cambridge

February 14-15, 2014
Location Lighting Workshop, Calumet San Diego, CA

February 17-18
Location Lighting Workshop, Calumet Santa Ana, CA

February 21-22, 2014
Location Lighting Workshop, Calumet Ft. Lauderdale, FL

March 22 , 2014
Lighting Portraits, Unique Photo, Fairfield, NJ (registration link coming soon)

March 28-29
Location Lighting Workshop Calumet Philadelphia

March 31-April
Location Lighting Workshop Calumet Washington/Tyson’s Corner

April 8, 2014
Boston Camera Club

April 16, 2014
Cape Cod Camera Club

April 27, 2014
NHPPA Annual Conference, Laconia, NH

Featured LG

Click To Enlarge Rick Friedman’s Feature in Society of Wedding and Portrait Photographers Convention Show guide.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rick Friedman has been a photojournalist for over three decades. Based in Boston, he travels the world for numerous publications, corporations, advertising assignments and film and television productions. His published work appears in Time, Newsweek, U.S. News, The New York Times, USA Today, The Guardian, Der Spiegel, Stern, Discover and many other publications. He has produced over 75 book and magazine covers. The books Hillary Clinton, Infra Structures, and The Gourmet Prescription are a few of his projects.

He is currently the President of the Boston Press Photographers Association. Friedman has won awards from the American Society of Media Photographers, the National Press Photographers Association, and the Boston Press Photographers Association. To learn more about Friedman, his work and workshops, visit:  http://rickfriedman.com

Lighting Workshop Rodeo

rvpgoldrushbanner

© Rob Van Petten

This full day workshop is geared towards the working photographer. It explores various lighting possibilities to add to your repertoire. Get ready for a workshop that goes beyond the basics.  In the morning choose between learning how to create high impact portraits with speedlites or build your understanding of how to shoot a high end product in a more compelling way. In the afternoon, get inspiration for shooting a business person on location, or learn new tricks in studio and location lighting. To close out the day we’ll have a special presentation which will explore interesting lighting techniques that leverage the unique properties of digital capture to create stunning  effects with “Lighting in Layers” & “False Color Lighting” techniques.

Most presenters will be demonstrating in the studio using either actual products shot for clients or live models.  Some presenters may leave time at the end of their demonstration for participants to take advantage of the studio setup and apply what they have learned using their own camera or they will leave time for Q&A.

RVPQ-20110701-0844NX_

© Rob Van Petten

In addition to exciting presentations, several lighting manufacturer representatives will be on hand display and answer question regarding the latest and greatest equipment, including Jim Morton from Dynalite as well as Dynalite VIP Rob Van Petten.  Rob will be giving a three hour workshop designed to build your confidence in studio and location lighting with a variety of lighting tools. Beyond the safety of the soft box there is a menu of other lighting options that give your lighting mood, dramatic effects, and individual style.  You will learn the use of a variety of light modifiers separately and in combinations. Rob will demonstrate building a rhythm of light zones – light dynamics – made easy with a live model demonstration.

Lunch, snacks, and coffee will be provided during the event.

 

Click Here To Register and for more details

 

XP-800 FREE Additional Battery Special w/ Purchase In March!

xp800promowhite

The Dynalite XP-800 Pure Sine Wave Inverter is answering the needs of today’s location photographers, weighing in at only 15lbs., the XP-800 is filled to the brim with power on the go for your studio strobes as well as modern electronic devices.  Purchase an XP-800 from any of our authorized Dynalite Dealers between March 1st – March 31st 2014 and you receive a FREE XP8-Li battery with with your purchase.  Enjoy the power and portability of the Dynalite XP-800 with extra life from the FREE additional battery while saving dollars with this limited time promotion!

Peter Read Miller’s Sports Photography Workshop West

Peter Read Miller’s photography workshops will continue for the 12th year in Denver, CO April 7-12, 2014. Join Peter, Syl Arena, SI Lighting Techs, and other industry experts for 6 intense days of photographing in an exciting all-digital program with access to the latest photographic and lighting equipment.

2013 PRM Denver Workshop from Peter Read Miller on Vimeo.

Students will shoot each city’s top university and high school sporting events.  Each day will begin with a review and critique of the previous day’s shooting.
The workshops will also feature lighting set-ups with studio strobes and speedlites as well as remote camera work and arena lighting instruction by Sports Illustrated Lighting Techs.
Workshop students will have the opportunity to work closely with Peter and take home hundreds of images shot with top of the line equipment.  Each student will also have a one-on-one portfolio review with Peter.

Additional instructors and speakers include:
-Steve Fine-New York, NY.  former Director of Photography, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED.
-Syl Arena-Paso Robles, CA.  Advertising, editorial photographer and speedlight guru.  Lecturer and author of “Speedlighters Handbook”.
-Jordan Murph-Honolulu, HI. Los Angeles based freelance editorial photographer and SPORTS ILLUSTRATED lighting technician.

Tuition for the week will include all instruction, the one-on-one portfolio review with Peter, and all location and model fees.
Sponsors include Canon, B&H Photo, Dynalite, Hoodman, Think Tank, and Western Digital.

Students will have access to the latest cameras and lenses from Canon as well as lighting gear from Dynalite. In addition we will have a pool of gear for setting up remotes and triggering options including Pocket Wizards. Past students have gone on the shoot for major newspapers and agencies (Getty Images, USA Today Sports Images, the Associated Press) and become NFL team photographers. Many have had their work published in national publications including SI, ESPN The Magazine and The Sporting News.  A student in the 2010 workshop had a photo he shot during the workshop run in the “Leading Off” section of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. Tuition for the six-day workshop is $1,895.00.  This includes all instruction, a one on one portfolio review with Peter and all model and location fees.  The students will be responsible for air and ground transportation as well as hotel accommodations.  The workshop will attempt offer a negotiated room rate at a hotel in the area.
Peter Read Miller’s
Sports Photography Workshop West
Denver, CO April 7-13, 2014

 

Dynalite At SPE National Conference

1009472_10201924824575583_1820704731_o

Come and join Dynalite National Sales Manager Jim Morton at this years SPE National Conference in Baltimore, Maryland.  Jim will showing the latest innovative products from Dynalite at booth #32 at the Baltimore Hilton March 6th – March 9th.  All attendees are eligible for show specials and other discounts.

In an age of interconnectedness, photographers are no longer solitary practitioners peering at the world through the singular eye of the viewfinder. Rather, photography is positioned at the heart of the contemporary art discourse, establishing relationships with a broad array of ideas and media. Photographers are reaching outside of themselves more than at any point in history, to collaborate with other artists and writers, expand international relationships, engage with and empower communities, organize into teams and collectives, hybridize across media and materials, and build online resource groups and community non-profit organizations to facilitate their ideas. This conference illuminates this new paradigm and celebrates the spirit of cooperation and social linkages. Join us in Baltimore for the 51st gathering of SPE and a celebration of the power of community and social exchange to propel new thinking in photographic practice.

Click here for more information and registration

Faces of Tradition: Weaving Elders of the Andes

Faces of Tradition Front Cover-hi-res

Click Here To Learn More

“Faces of Tradition: Weaving Elders of the Andes”  was a book project done for Thrums Books, Loveland, Colo., and the Center for Traditional Textiles of Cusco, (CTTC) Cusco, Peru.  The book was released in November 2013.

Our goal with the book was to portray the various groups of elders from the different indigenous villages in the Cusco area that the Center has established a working relationship with to help save and promote their ancient weaving traditions. These elders are passing on their knowledge to a younger generation so that these villages can then continue to create their beautiful textiles and help provide some income for their weavers and the villages.

We worked in 9 different villages throughout the Andean highlands. Some were near Cusco, and others more then 8 hours away via winding dirt roads. All the villages were between 11,000 and 14,000 feet in altitude. While it was not too hard on equipment, it was at times hard on us. I grew up and live in Colorado and I am used to a higher altitude, but there were days when all of us were dragging and gasping for air.

CTTCCHIN-0467When we arrived at each village, we would scout locations then set up to photograph the weaving elders from that village.  Very few of the villages had electricity and even if they did, it was always a bit iffy. I had been to a few of the villages on another assignment so I knew what to expect. The UNI-400‘s were great for this project. Small and rugged enough, they provided just enough light  for what I needed for the portraits. I normally just used one head for the majority of the portrait shots. The Jackrabbit batteries are small enough so they are easily packed, don’t way a ton and can be charged anywhere in the world. On this project I normally shot tethered to a Mac Book Pro, which allowed me to show the elders what they looked like after we finished, and it always was interesting to see the reactions from them. Many had never seen a photo of themselves and were astonished. The comment I most heard was that they didn’t know they looked so old.

 

 

youngJoeI grew up in the foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of Southern Colorado, near a little town called Weston. My mother was an avid amateur photographer who loved to photograph her family. Her love seems to have rubbed off on me. In 1976, I moved to L.A. to study photography at Art Center College of Design. It was a great time and place for learning, buzzing with experimentation and promise. But there’s something about Colorado that drew me back.

For the last 30 years I’ve been based out of Fort Collins, Colorado. My studio is in an old red brick building which originally housed a neighborhood grocer back in 1912. My wife and I, plus two dogs and four turtles live upstairs. On assignment I’ve been lucky to travel all over the world taking photographs for a lot of terrific clients.

Joe Coca
 Visit Joe’s Website and see more of his work

Chris Crisman: Master Of The Person In Their Place

1

A University of Pennsylvania graduate, Chris Crisman creates masterful environmental portraits. The art of environmental portraiture is to show something about a person by incorporating key elements of their work or other avocation. On these pages, you can see how Crisman does that and how he uses dramatic lighting and composition to guide the viewer to the critical elements within the frame.

The goal of any environmental portrait is to place the person being photographed in the surroundings that reflect that individual’s personality. The very best photographers are able to inject just enough of their own personality—their impressions and evaluations of the subject—to enable the viewers to gain a further insight into the person being photographed. Whether he’s photographing billionaire entrepreneur Sir Richard Branson for Wired or a local Titusville gunsmith, Chris Crisman brings enough of himself into the photos to create images that are greater than the sum of their parts.

Like so many accomplished photographers that have come before him, Crisman didn’t wait around for assignments to build a creative body of work. Rather, it was a series of imaginative test shoots that brought attention to his unique eye.

DPP: What is it about environmental portraiture that interests you?

1Chris Crisman: When I started in photography in the middle of college—I went to the University of Pennsylvania—I was really into the landscape. That had a lot to do with my upbringing. I’m an only child. We were in the countryside, 10 miles from Titusville, in a very wooded and hilly area in rural Pennsylvania. I did a lot of exploring and played a lot of make-believe. It was just me and my dogs. I was driving a tractor and a four-wheeler by the time I was 10. It’s like in The Return of the Jedi, when they’re on Endor flying through that awesome forest. That’s how I thought of it driving four-wheelers there. That was a pretty big influence to me. My parents managed the land, making sure nobody did any illegal dumping or illegal cutting of trees.

My father had been a steelworker and that gets into how I started with the environmental portraits. In the area I grew up, the steel mills boomed with the two World Wars, then tapered down, but were still very active into the 1980s. Then the steel industry left and the town has never really been the same. My dad was vice president of the steelworkers union at the time, so the process of getting laid off, then retiring and disability—his story is very impactful on my story.

DPP: How so? Did you document those transitions?

Crisman: The closing of the steel mill happened while I was in middle school. It emotionally had a major impact on me, though I wasn’t expressing it with a camera at that time. I was documenting it mentally. When I got into photography, the first couple of years, I was mostly interested in landscape work and really loved working back close to home. I wasn’t actually a fine-art student at the University of Pennsylvania. I majored in environmental studies and have minors in cultural anthropology and biology. I took a lot of elective photography classes. For my senior project I documented what remained of the steel mill, as well as its environmental and social impact. The pictures are a metaphor for what I felt the whole town was going through and what it’s left with. Even then—2002, 2003—when I was still shooting with film, I was trying to do some things with manipulation to express what I wanted to say with my images.

DPP: How did you transition out of school into being a successful photographer, with clients ranging from Infiniti and AOL to Red Bull and Cirque du Soleil? That’s not easy, given the economic woes of the past decade.

Crisman: After finishing school, I had about six weeks of flailing about and working at restaurants. Then I got a full-time assistant/studio manager/retoucher job with a photographer in Philadelphia. Some nights I also did retouching for a wedding photographer. Eventually, I built up enough of a personal body of work that I could go after my own assignments.

DPP: What’s the photographic scene like in Philadelphia? Why there as your base?

Crisman: I haven’t been convinced to move yet. I went to school here. When I graduated, I was super-broke and couldn’t move. We have a little more creative freedom here than I think we would have in New York. I’d probably do more editorial and celebrity-type stuff if I lived there, but mentally, I like a little more space. The work I get comes in from everywhere, and I’m 15 minutes from the airport. The biggest job this year came out of an agency in Austin.

2DPP: Both your assignment and personal work often have an illustrative look to it. How do you achieve that?

Crisman: It depends on the project. When we’re talking about my environmental portraiture, it’s often about heroic characters and archetypes. To support that, I shoot a certain way— the hero in the foreground carrying strong weight against a background that’s still very important to the picture. I’m very precise in how I light people, how I like skin tones to look. When I get into the retouching side of things, it’s almost case-specific. I don’t think I’m an incredible documentary photographer, so I don’t feel the need to have freedom with the camera. I like to make a decision about the place that I’m shooting and the edges of the frame and shoot from a tripod. What this allows me to do is to interact with the subject.

For a portrait, we might do five different shots in a day. They’re going to be five different frames, but amongst those groups there’s not going to be a lot of variation. Using the tripod, I shoot the space without the subject, plating it essentially, making a full range of exposures. Then we bring in the subject, and during that process, we might make a minor move. If we do, I ask the subject to step out of frame for a moment and we quickly replate it.

DPP: Which image would serve as a good example of this approach?

Crisman: The picture of the gunsmith from the Titusville project. There’s a lot of nostalgia for the golden age of the town in that shot. For that image, I did some shots with some of the ambient lights on, then off—a lot of different ways to get to the final feel. I wanted the viewer to be able to see all the details. In post, multiple plates were put together. I wanted only the gun and the bullets to pop, so we used pieces of those things to pull it all together. Once I get to the point that I like a certain frame, I want to keep it flexible for the postproduction phase where I’m working with my digital artist Taisya Kuzmenko to pull everything together. I haven’t retouched my own work since 2009, due to the volume of what we do.

DPP: Both your assignment and personal work often have an illustrative look to it. How do you achieve that?

Crisman: It depends on the project. When we’re talking about my environmental portraiture, it’s often about heroic characters and archetypes. To support that, I shoot a certain way— the hero in the foreground carrying strong weight against a background that’s still very important to the picture. I’m very precise in how I light people, how I like skin tones to look. When I get into the retouching side of things, it’s almost case-specific. I don’t think I’m an incredible documentary photographer, so I don’t feel the need to have freedom with the camera. I like to make a decision about the place that I’m shooting and the edges of the frame and shoot from a tripod. What this allows me to do is to interact with the subject.

For a portrait, we might do five different shots in a day. They’re going to be five different frames, but amongst those groups there’s not going to be a lot of variation. Using the tripod, I shoot the space without the subject, plating it essentially, making a full range of exposures. Then we bring in the subject, and during that process, we might make a minor move. If we do, I ask the subject to step out of frame for a moment and we quickly replate it.

Picture_002_fs

DPP: Which image would serve as a good example of this approach?

Crisman: The picture of the gunsmith from the Titusville project. There’s a lot of nostalgia for the golden age of the town in that shot. For that image, I did some shots with some of the ambient lights on, then off—a lot of different ways to get to the final feel. I wanted the viewer to be able to see all the details. In post, multiple plates were put together. I wanted only the gun and the bullets to pop, so we used pieces of those things to pull it all together. Once I get to the point that I like a certain frame, I want to keep it flexible for the postproduction phase where I’m working with my digital artist Taisya Kuzmenko to pull everything together. I haven’t retouched my own work since 2009, due to the volume of what we do.

DPP: Both your assignment and personal work often have an illustrative look to it. How do you achieve that?

Crisman: It depends on the project. When we’re talking about my environmental portraiture, it’s often about heroic characters and archetypes. To support that, I shoot a certain way— the hero in the foreground carrying strong weight against a background that’s still very important to the picture. I’m very precise in how I light people, how I like skin tones to look. When I get into the retouching side of things, it’s almost case-specific. I don’t think I’m an incredible documentary photographer, so I don’t feel the need to have freedom with the camera. I like to make a decision about the place that I’m shooting and the edges of the frame and shoot from a tripod. What this allows me to do is to interact with the subject.

For a portrait, we might do five different shots in a day. They’re going to be five different frames, but amongst those groups there’s not going to be a lot of variation. Using the tripod, I shoot the space without the subject, plating it essentially, making a full range of exposures. Then we bring in the subject, and during that process, we might make a minor move. If we do, I ask the subject to step out of frame for a moment and we quickly replate it.

DPP: Which image would serve as a good example of this approach?

Crisman: The picture of the gunsmith from the Titusville project. There’s a lot of nostalgia for the golden age of the town in that shot. For that image, I did some shots with some of the ambient lights on, then off—a lot of different ways to get to the final feel. I wanted the viewer to be able to see all the details. In post, multiple plates were put together. I wanted only the gun and the bullets to pop, so we used pieces of those things to pull it all together. Once I get to the point that I like a certain frame, I want to keep it flexible for the postproduction phase where I’m working with my digital artist Taisya Kuzmenko to pull everything together. I haven’t retouched my own work since 2009, due to the volume of what we do.

I think the reality of environmental portraiture, or any kind of portraiture, is you’ve got to dance with the subject a bit, especially someone who has never been in a formal portrait session before. There are a lot of “real” people in my work. With a lot of the celebrities I photograph on assignment, we often have only 10 minutes, so you need to create flexibility for the client on the back end. We might spend two weeks in post.

3

The work can be challenging. When he photographed Sir Richard Branson for Wired magazine, Crisman had 10 minutes to shoot three subjects for the cover, including Branson. Once he got the shot Wired wanted, he took two minutes to take the shot he wanted, the image of Branson shown here.

DPP: Tell us about the Richard Branson shots you did for Wired magazine. Was that one of those assignments with major time constraints?

Crisman: We had him for 10 minutes and we did three pictures with him in that time frame. One of them was for a cover. We had to shoot two other people into the cover. We spent about five minutes on the cover, about three minutes on the secondary shot and about two minutes on the shot that I wanted to make, which is the portrait of him pulling his hair back.

DPP: Was he actually shot where the background is?

Crisman: Yeah. That’s actually as simple as it gets. We were at the Mojave Air and Space Port in the Mojave Desert where they’re building the scaled composites of the Virgin Galactic, the spaceships.

DPP: How did you create the image of the young boy with the spaceship?

Crisman: The pieces were shot separately. The kid was shot in the studio. The rocket was actually an 18-inch- high model. That was personal work.

4

In addition to his stunning still photography, Crisman has branched out into motion work. Inside many still photographers there’s a budding filmmaker. Crisman is using RED cameras in his motion projects.

DPP: What camera and lighting equipment are you working with to create these photos?

Crisman: As for cameras, it depends on the project. The Canon cameras are easier to use and there’s a lot of flexibility with them, but the image quality from the IQ back is amazing. When I need to get faster shutter speeds to bring the background down outdoors, the Hasselblad is fantastic for that. When I use the Hasselblad, I like to shoot on a remote so I’m not bumping the tripod and also have the mirror up because that mirror slamming down can cause camera shake. It’s a nice sound, but it doesn’t help the pictures.

My strobes and battery packs are Dynalites. It’s what I learned on. We use a range of small to large Octabanks with them. Sometimes, I like using the extra-small Chimera softboxes. Sometimes, we use grids on them. So, they’re a direct light source, but soft. I don’t like hard shadows on a face, but I like shaping the face. The general idea is real people in real spaces. That’s what I’m trying to convey. I want to give a summation of that person’s experience. I almost always want something to be inspirational, even if something has a darker tone to it. I want people to connect to it and for the pictures to be thoughtful.

DPP: In your work, it’s obvious people skills are an important component.

Crisman: I try to get people to look at my work ahead of a shoot; they usually can find some people in some of the images who they can relate to. If it’s about just getting through the session in time, I try and show that that’s what I’m concerned about, too. If they’re worried about looking bad in front of the camera, I’ll discuss what their concerns are. There’s a lot of therapy involved with this. They’re putting themselves out there for the world to see, so there’s fear that comes with that. I think it’s a good idea to get yourself in front of the camera once in awhile to remind yourself of the experience.

DPP: In addition to your still photography, you’re working with motion on occasion, as well.

Crisman: It’s the reality of the times. The general idea that I like to shoot from a tripod and shoot remotely frees me up to direct. It’s a similar process. We’ve done some behind-the-scenes videos of my shoots and some pieces for AARP. Those were shot with the RED. I’m not the cinematographer. I’m the director.

DPP: You often use the word “we” instead of “I” when talking about your shoots. Your team seems to play a big role in your work.

Crisman: In the last few years, as the productions get bigger, the schedule gets tighter and the expectations become a lot higher, it has really become a lot more about trusting and collaborating with the people I work with. We’re trying as a team to do unique things—not be boring, not be simple—and produce special, meaningful work.

Information and images taken from the December 2013 issue of Digital Photo Pro. 

chris

See More Of Chris’s Work

Claire Rosen’s “Constructed Image” at International Center Of Photography

12This advanced workshop covers all of the elements involved in creating conceptual and thematic imagery from idea generation through execution. It is ideal for photographers who are comfortable with the technical aspects of their equipment and want to create staged narrative images. Students are taken step by step through the process of how to make a picture concept a reality, covering mood boards, production sheets, pre-production, and scheduling, with lectures on how to source locations, props, and lighting theory; how to cast and work with subjects; as well as problem-solving, communication, and working efficiently on set or on location. Students develop and execute their shoot concepts with support from the instructor.

In preparation for this class, begin to gather props and wardrobe as you think about concepts you might like to execute during the workshop. Also, there will be some models available during the second day of the workshop, but if there is someone specific whom you would like to work with, you should make arrangements for them to be available that weekend.

clairebanner

You should also start looking through staged and/or conceptual imagery that you admire and bring examples of those images to the first class, as well as 10-16 examples of your work, either as low res jpegs or prints, and a pen and notebook. For the second day, you should bring your camera equipment, laptop and card reader, and the set, prop, and wardrobe needed for your shoot.

In addition to the above, there is a short reading assignment which should be completed before the start of class, and a survey which can be sent to the instructor beforehand, or brought to the first morning of class. Both the reading and survey will be sent to you upon registration.

Dates:  February 15-16, 2014 
Meets:  February 15-16 |Sat- Sun 10:00 am -5:00 pm
Where: International Center of Photography

Click Here To Register

 

Claire Rosen

Claire Rosen

Claire Rosen is a photographer and video artist blending a fine art sensibility with commercial work to create whimsical imagery inspired by fairy tales, fables, and other children’s stories. Her fashion, fine art and advertising work touch on the bizarre and unusual with the themes of vintage circus, burlesque, magic, curiosities and natural science interwoven throughout the images. Rosen is drawn both to beauty and darkness as it exists in life, and her images explore this duality.

Claire’s work has been recognized by Communication Arts Photography Annual, The International Photography Awards, Graphis Photo Annual, Prix de la Photographie, The Sony World Awards, Artists Wanted: Exposure, The Art Project: W Magazine as well as most recently being included in Forbes 30 under 30 in 2012 for Art & Design.

Her commercial client list includes Alex Randall Bespoke Lighting, Alex Young, Bangz Salon & Spa, Neiman Marcus at Short Hills, Nike Global Football, Random House Publishing and Ryan Wilde Millinery. Her work has been published in Crafts Magazine, Doubleday Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar Arabia, Harper’s Baazar Hong Kong, Jumeriah Magazine, The London Sunday Fashion Times, Mia Magazine, Millionaire Lifestyle Magazine, N.E.E.T Magazine, Prevention Magazine, and Tatler Magazine.

In addition, Claire lectures and teaches courses around the world in photography through Foundry Workshops, Gulf Photo Plus, Hallmark Institute, International Center for Photography, The New Jersey Visual Arts Center, NORDphotography, Unique University and The Yard School.

To learn more about Claire and her work, visit her website at http://www.clairerosenphoto.com